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Grant Details

Grant Number: 5R21CA158868-02 Interpret this number
Primary Investigator: Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice
Organization: Ohio State University
Project Title: Marital Discord, Fast Food, Obesity, and Inflammation
Fiscal Year: 2012


Abstract

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Diet clearly impacts inflammation; about one-third of the total energy intake in the US population comes from fast food consumption that is typically high in saturated fat, and recent demonstrations of enhanced inflammation following meals high in saturated fats have sparked interest in the possibility that postprandial inflammation acts as a driver for chronic inflammatory responses; when high-fat, fast-food-type meals flood the body with simple carbohydrates and triglycerides, the meals may also provoke spikes in IL-6 and CRP while enhancing oxidative stress and sympathetic hyperactivity. Furthermore, proinflammatory responses to high-fat meals are exaggerated by obesity, particularly visceral adiposity, and high-fat meals push obesity's characteristic elevated inflammation levels even higher and sustain them longer. Depression and psychosocial stress can also directly promote proinflammatory cytokine production, and a turbulent marriage is a rich source for both; marital discord greatly enhances risk for depression, and marital discord also has notable physiological repercussions as documented by its association with poorer clinical outcomes for inflammation-related conditions including cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. A series of well-controlled laboratory studies have provided important mechanistic data; negative or hostile behavior during marital conflict (a hallmark of marital discord) substantially augments adverse endocrine and immune changes, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Drawing on behavioral, nutritional, and immunological research, this double-blind, randomized crossover trial will assess changes in inflammation and mood following a fast-food-type meal compared to a healthier meal (moderate level of fats) in distressed and nondistressed couples. Couples will be asked to discuss and resolve a disagreement following both meals to maximize the salience and impact of marital distress on meal- related inflammatory responses; behavioral coding of these interactions will provide data on hostile marital behaviors. Our primary aim is to characterize the impact of a fast-food-type meal compared to a healthier meal on postprandial inflammatory responses in distressed and nondistressed couples, and to appraise the relative impact of central adiposity as a predictor of inflammatory responses. Our secondary, exploratory aim is to assess the relative contributions of gender and negative or hostile marital behaviors to depressive symptoms and inflammatory responses at baseline, as well as following the meal challenge. This proposal provides a new perspective on the biobehavioral pathways through which obesity, diet, and marital discord interact to promote inflammation. Elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with cancer risk, depression, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, Type II diabetes, and frailty and functional decline, underscoring the broad clinical relevance. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This project seeks to lay the foundation for translational research that would enhance our understanding of the biobehavioral pathways through which obesity, diet, and marital discord interact to promote inflammation. The evidence that fast food-type meals promote postprandial dysmetabolism is relatively recent and still preliminary, but the possibility that postprandial inflammation acts as a driver for chronic inflammation is clearly important. Elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with cancer risk, depression, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, Type II diabetes, and frailty and functional decline, underscoring the broad clinical relevance.



Publications

Cortisol slopes and conflict: A spouse's perceived stress matters.
Authors: Shrout M.R. , Renna M.E. , Madison A.A. , Jaremka L.M. , Fagundes C.P. , Malarkey W.B. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2020 11; 121, p. 104839.
EPub date: 2020-08-16.
PMID: 32853875
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For better and worse? The roles of closeness, marital behavior, and age in spouses' cardiometabolic similarity.
Authors: Wilson S.J. , Peng J. , Andridge R. , Jaremka L.M. , Fagundes C.P. , Malarkey W.B. , Belury M.A. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2020 10; 120, p. 104777.
EPub date: 2020-06-17.
PMID: 32623020
Related Citations

Marital distress, depression, and a leaky gut: Translocation of bacterial endotoxin as a pathway to inflammation.
Authors: Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. , Wilson S.J. , Bailey M.L. , Andridge R. , Peng J. , Jaremka L.M. , Fagundes C.P. , Malarkey W.B. , Laskowski B. , Belury M.A. .
Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2018 12; 98, p. 52-60.
EPub date: 2018-08-04.
PMID: 30098513
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When couples' hearts beat together: Synchrony in heart rate variability during conflict predicts heightened inflammation throughout the day.
Authors: Wilson S.J. , Bailey B.E. , Jaremka L.M. , Fagundes C.P. , Andridge R. , Malarkey W.B. , Gates K.M. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2018 07; 93, p. 107-116.
EPub date: 2018-04-21.
PMID: 29709758
Related Citations

Shortened sleep fuels inflammatory responses to marital conflict: Emotion regulation matters.
Authors: Wilson S.J. , Jaremka L.M. , Fagundes C.P. , Andridge R. , Peng J. , Malarkey W.B. , Habash D. , Belury M.A. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2017 05; 79, p. 74-83.
EPub date: 2017-02-16.
PMID: 28262602
Related Citations

Depression, daily stressors and inflammatory responses to high-fat meals: when stress overrides healthier food choices.
Authors: Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. , Fagundes C.P. , Andridge R. , Peng J. , Malarkey W.B. , Habash D. , Belury M.A. .
Source: Molecular psychiatry, 2017 03; 22(3), p. 476-482.
EPub date: 2016-09-20.
PMID: 27646264
Related Citations

Novel Links between Troubled Marriages and Appetite Regulation: Marital Distress, Ghrelin, and Diet Quality.
Authors: Jaremka L.M. , Belury M.A. , Andridge R.R. , Lindgren M.E. , Habash D. , Malarkey W.B. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Clinical psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, 2016 May; 4(3), p. 363-375.
EPub date: 2015-07-29.
PMID: 27186446
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Erythrocyte linoleic acid, but not oleic acid, is associated with improvements in body composition in men and women.
Authors: Belury M.A. , Cole R.M. , Bailey B.E. , Ke J.Y. , Andridge R.R. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Molecular nutrition & food research, 2016 05; 60(5), p. 1206-12.
EPub date: 2016-03-22.
PMID: 26923704
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Stress, Depression, and Metabolism: Replies to Bohan Brown et al. and Barton and Yancy.
Authors: Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. , Andridge R. , Belury M.A. .
Source: Biological psychiatry, 2015-08-15; 78(4), p. e13-4.
EPub date: 2014-12-08.
PMID: 25582266
Related Citations

Marital discord, past depression, and metabolic responses to high-fat meals: Interpersonal pathways to obesity.
Authors: Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. , Jaremka L. , Andridge R. , Peng J. , Habash D. , Fagundes C.P. , Glaser R. , Malarkey W.B. , Belury M.A. .
Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2015 Feb; 52, p. 239-50.
EPub date: 2014-12-03.
PMID: 25506778
Related Citations

Interpersonal stressors predict ghrelin and leptin levels in women.
Authors: Jaremka L.M. , Belury M.A. , Andridge R.R. , Malarkey W.B. , Glaser R. , Christian L. , Emery C.F. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2014 Oct; 48, p. 178-88.
EPub date: 2014-06-30.
PMID: 25032903
Related Citations

Psychiatry and social nutritional neuroscience.
Authors: Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. , Jaremka L.M. , Hughes S. .
Source: World psychiatry : official journal of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), 2014 Jun; 13(2), p. 151-2.
PMID: 24890067
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Telomere length: a marker of disease susceptibility?
Authors: Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. , Jaremka L.M. , Derry H.M. , Glaser R. .
Source: Brain, behavior, and immunity, 2013 Nov; 34, p. 29-30.
EPub date: 2013-08-13.
PMID: 23954395
Related Citations

Marital distress prospectively predicts poorer cellular immune function.
Authors: Jaremka L.M. , Glaser R. , Malarkey W.B. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2013 Nov; 38(11), p. 2713-9.
EPub date: 2013-07-20.
PMID: 23880114
Related Citations

Attachment anxiety is linked to alterations in cortisol production and cellular immunity.
Authors: Jaremka L.M. , Glaser R. , Loving T.J. , Malarkey W.B. , Stowell J.R. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Psychological science, 2013-03-01; 24(3), p. 272-9.
EPub date: 2013-01-10.
PMID: 23307944
Related Citations

Plasma vasopressin and interpersonal functioning.
Authors: Gouin J.P. , Carter C.S. , Pournajafi-Nazarloo H. , Malarkey W.B. , Loving T.J. , Stowell J. , Kiecolt-Glaser J.K. .
Source: Biological psychology, 2012 Oct; 91(2), p. 270-4.
EPub date: 2012-07-20.
PMID: 22820037
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