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Grant Details

Grant Number: 3P50CA244433-03S2 Interpret this number
Primary Investigator: Emmons, Karen
Organization: Harvard School Of Public Health
Project Title: ISCCCE: Advancing Health Equity Through Implementation Science: Environmental Scans and Cross-Site Collaboration
Fiscal Year: 2021


Abstract

Abstract Social determinants of health are key influencers of health inequality and contribute to health disparities between populations and communities. Implementation science (IS) has particular potential to accelerate progress toward achieving health equity goals, and significant work has focused on implementation in settings that serve marginalized populations. Context is a central feature of IS, yet it is frequently poorly defined or goes unreported. When it is considered, attention to context is mostly focused on the inner setting in which the intervention is implemented, with relatively little consideration of how the outer context may impact on implementation. It is naïve to think that implementing organizations are not impacted by their community context. It is in the context in which employees are hired and work, that patients live in, and in which organizations must acquire goods and services to support their business and health care mission. Failure to fully measure outer context and to use that data to inform implementation efforts limits the applicability and generalizability of study findings to different populations, settings, and time periods. This supplement application from the Implementation Science Center for Cancer Control Equity (ISCCCE) will meet this challenge by partnering with the six other ISC3 centers to create a set of outer context common data elements (OC-CDE) that will be collected for all centers. This supplement represents a unique opportunity to create a robust set of shared measures that can be utilized to understand and explore the impact of outer context on implementation outcomes in a wide range of settings. This is a critical effort to conduct an environment scan that will characterize the outer implementation context in a comprehensive manner and that will represent such a diverse range of settings across the US.



Publications


None. See parent grant details.


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