Skip to main content

COVID-19 Resources

What people with cancer should know: https://www.cancer.gov/coronavirus

Guidance for cancer researchers: https://www.cancer.gov/coronavirus-researchers

Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.covid19.nih.gov

Grant Details

Grant Number: 3U01CA253858-02S1 Interpret this number
Primary Investigator: Meza, Rafael
Organization: University Of Michigan At Ann Arbor
Project Title: Cisnet Lung Disparities Supplement
Fiscal Year: 2021


Abstract

Project Summary Abstract Lung cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S and the leading cause of cancer deaths. Although lung cancer incidence and mortality in the US are decreasing, important differences by gender and race remain. Despite having lower smoking rates than other racial groups, Black men face the highest incidence and mortality rate of lung cancer in the US. Similarly, Black women have lower smoking rates than White women in the US, but have comparable lung cancer incidence and mortality rates to White women and higher lung cancer rates than other racial/ethnic groups. Lung cancer incidence by histology also differs greatly by race/ethnicity, with Black men and women being at higher risk for squamous cell carcinoma than other racial/ethnic groups. Given the observed heterogeneity in screening efficacy by histological type, these differences could affect the effectiveness of lung cancer screening in the Black population. The CISNET models of lung cancer natural history have been useful tools to understand the impacts of preventive interventions (tobacco control and screening) on lung cancer at a population level. We propose to extend and use one of the CISNET Lung models, MichiganLung, to 1) model lung cancer incidence and mortality in the US Non-Hispanic Black population (NHB), 2) determine the contributions of various factors along the cancer control continuum to disparities in lung cancer mortality in NHB relative to the whole population, and 3) evaluate the potential impact of screening and other interventions to reduce lung cancer burden and existing disparities in NHB.



Publications


None. See parent grant details.


Back to Top